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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the middle east, and extraordinary new ways of looking at science and medicine when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. the middle east where president obama is in the midst of a three day visit to israel it marks his first visit to the country as president, speaking in jerusalem today the prident urged israelies to make sacrifices in the interests of sustainable peace with the palestinians. >> israelis must recognize that continued settlement activity is counterproductive to the cause of peace. and that an independent palestine must be viable, with real borders that have to be drawn. >> rose: the president also affirmed that america will continue to stand behind israel. he made a targeted appeal to the youth in attendance. >> and today i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there is no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america, atem lo lavat. (applause) you are not alone. >> rose: joining me martin indyk, director of
. the journal "science translational medicine" published the findings today. the treatment is experimental and has only been used on five adult patients whose bodies resisted chemotherapy. the treatment genetically alters a patient's own immune cells to fight the cancer. one patient saw all traces of his leukemia disappear within eight days of treatment. and three of the five patients have now been in remission for five to 24 months. general motors announced a recall of 27,000 vehicles because of problems with their automatic transmissions. the recall affects the 2013 models of buick's full-size lacrosse cars and cadillac's s.r.x. crossover s.u.v. g.m. cited a software problem that could cause the transmission to shift to sport mode and increase the risk of a crash, although none have been reported. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we continue our focus on the middle east with a deeper look at the question of chemical weapons and their possible use in syria. i'm joined by leonard spector, deputy director of the monterey institute's center for nonp
degrees in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. in the u.s., 76% of all registered -- from the top, from the top 10% producing. they come from foreign students. foreign students here in the u.s. who then become inventors. these foreign-born inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their background in these hard sciences. in our current system, we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them the world's best education, and then we send them home so that they can compete against us. and, frankly, this makes no sense. america's current involvement in asia must not be confined by the same old approaches that may have once served a purpose, but for now woefully outdated. indeed, we must harness the full potential of american ingenuity to address the spectrum of challenges we have before us. and this is out build samsung in the aftermath of the korean war. and much like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, south korea and samsung are today truly world class. together, we can ensure that the future legacy of ame
a colleague here in congress brush off the warnings of science about climate change, saying, "god's still up there," implying that there's no need to worry about climate change. well, if god is still up there, what better use of the gifts of moral reasoning that we have been given as his people than to protect his creation and one another from harm? madam president, as we sing in the old hymn, "field and forest, veil and mountain, flowering meadow, flashing sea, chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in thee." we are each called in our own way to wake up and to do the right thing. i yield the floor. mr. nelson: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from florida. mr. nelson: madam president, i just want to comment on the senator from rhode island's comments. first of all, i know it's so heartfelt and so genuine, and i want to thank him for that. and i want to thank him from approaching it from a faith-based standpoint about this fragile ecosystem that we live on called planet earth. and he's brought a perspective with that chart that he had of the earth that it is
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute betw
. they want a home where science and technology is created to build and not destroy. they want to live in peace, free from terror and threats that are so often directed at the israeli people. that's the future that they deserve. that's the vision that is shared by both our nations, and that is shimon peres' life work. and as president, michelle and i have such fond memories of your visit to the white house last spring, when i was honored to present you with america's highest civilian honor, our medal of freedom. and that medal was a tribute to your extraordinary life, in which you held virtually every position in the israeli government. so today was another opportunity for me to benefit from the president's perspective on a whole range of topics, from the historic changes that are taking place across the region, to the perils of a nuclear-armed iran, to the imperatives of peace between israelis and palestinians, to the promise of our digital age. and i should note that one of the advantages of talking to president peres is not only does he have astonishing vision, but he's also a prett
science and technology is created to build and not destroy. they want to live in peace, free from terror and threats that are so often directed at the israeli people. that's the future that they deserve. that's the vision that is shared by both our nations. and that is shimon peres' life work. and michelle and i have such fond memories of your visit to the white house. last spring when i was honored to present you with america's highest civilian honor, our medal of freedom. and that medal was a tribute to your extraordinary life in which you held virtually every position in the israeli government. today was another opportunity -- from the historic changes taking place across the region to the perils of a nuclear armed iran, to the perils and peace between israelis and palestinians to the promise of our digital age. one of the advantages of talking to president peres is not only does he have astonishing vision, but he's also pretty practical-minded politician. and consistently has good advice in terms of how we can approach many of these problems. i reaffirmed to president peres as i will
. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> according to an interesting article today in the united arab emirate
, however, the public generally views these space activities as little more than interesting science projects if they know about them at all. yet without them americans' lives would fundamentally change. let me explain with a few brief examples. gps is with the internet one of only two global utilities. it facilitates, for example, having emergency response vehicles reach their destinations by the shortest routes, potentially saving lives, for transoceanic air travel to be safer and more efficient because planes can fly closer together. and if the new satellite-reliant air traffic control system is implemented, reduce jet fuel consumption by one million barrels annually saving both money and the environment, and it saves the trucking industry an estimated $53 billion annually in fuel costs and better fleet management. in addition to the economic benefits of space which are vital to the national interest, there are also direct security implications. politically the recent meteor right that hit the russian yules with the force of an atomic bomb was a stark wake-up call regarding threat
believe in science and in evidence, and i do not think there is any scientific evidence that says that we should have such a public policy that tries to do what you have described that bill is doing in new jersey. i do not know the exact bill, but clyde conversion -- >> conversion therapy. >> i do not know what the evidence is, but i know it is disrespectful, and discriminatory, and therefore, i would oppose the conversion therapy and support the bill as we have in california. again, i have not seen that particular bill. s in the bill says there is a ban on conversion therapy. what is the point? what is the point? what is the point? i think it is stale. i think under people understand we talk about respect for all of god's children, not wanting to be discriminatory in any respect, that that really has the place, and it certainly does not. would that be in the schools? are they doing it in the schools are taking people side -- >> i am not sure, but i was wondering more broadly what you think, because these are being proposed. >> what is their purpose? we have been through this. when i came
on the fourth amendment and drones surveillance. received her j.d. from new york law school, bachelor of science degree from florida state university. please go ahead. >> thank you, chairman leahy, ranking member grassley, and members of the committee for your leadership on this area. in our statement today, epic recognizes that drones have tremendous positive uses in the united states. however, when drones are used to obtain evidence or gather personal information about identifiable individuals, rules are necessary to ensure that fundamental standards for fairness, privacy and accountability are preserved. recent records received by epic under the freedom of information act demonstrate that the bureau of customs and border protection has outfitted drones with technology for electronic signals and interception and human identification. law enforcement offices across the country have expressed interest in the purchase and use of drone technology. records released shows that law enforcement in texas, kansas, washington are using drones. the florida police chief's association has expressed interest
and the consideration by the court of proposition 8. i believe in science and i believe in evidence and i don't think there is any scientific evidence that says that we should have such a public policy that tries to do what you described that bill in doing in new jersey. i'm not familiar with that exact bill, but conversion -- >> conversion therapy. >> i don't know what the scientific evidence is to go down that path. i do know it's disrespectful and discriminatory and therefore i would oppose the conversion therapy and support the bill as we have in california. again i haven't seen that particular bill. i assume the bill says there is a ban on conversion therapy. what is the point? what is the point? i think it's stale. i think that younger people understand that we talk about respect for all, respect for all god's children, not want be to be discriminatory in any respect. that that really has no place and it certainly doesn't. will that be in the schools? is that what they are doing in the schools? taking people aside? >> i'm not sure. i just wonder more broadly what you think. more of these bills
and in return students got to go to a science and technology program. one says it is down to the stark economics of state. take a listen. >> american public education has financial crisis. time for new revenue streams. superintendents are looking for ail tern it national revenue streams because they are been passing the buck on to it parents for too long. property taxes are down. it is time for new solutions. >> in different districts they allow company representatives to spend time in the classroom with the kids and pushes the corporation and its name directly at the kids. an increasing number of parents and activists are concerned this is a cynical ploy by corporations. >> the companies aren't doing this out of the goodness of their heart. they are doing it because they want to get that lifetime brand loyalty. i think that school districts really need to think about this. this isn't a donation. this is corporations looking to target children and so it is one thing to take a donation. it is another thing to say in return we are going to allow you to have access to students. >> strong arguments
those jobs. we need the labor. we also need -- there's a lot of high, high end science technology engineering math talent in this country, students who come from overseas. we need them to stay here because they'll create jobs in the united states. right, ed? >> so, ed, what is the deal? how do we get to a comprehensive immigration reform package that both sides can agree on? >> well, you know, joe, it's very similar to the discussions we've been having about the debt. both sides are going to have to give a little. there's not going to be a bill with democrats will not vote for a bill without a real path way to citizenship. and that's to some people in the republican party that's -- they consider that amnesty. it has to be in the bill. and for our side, we have to understand that stepped up enforcement at the border, verify for businesses, that has to be part of the bill or else republicans won't vote for it. each side has to give a little. if they do. this is easier to achieve than obviously the debt is. and maybe this can be a precursor to working something out on the debt. we ne
from an asteroid, does that help us perfect our ability to avoid this kind of catastrophe? science yougreat can do. likely, the mission we have to mount some day, and we will have to some day, is likely to be done robotic the. the distances are quite large from the earth. there is a connection between the two. you still need to find them. we do not currently have a set of good targets to run a huge -- human mission. ahead -- >> ben bernanke says the banking shut down in cyprus is not likely to have it shut down in the u.s. but they are keeping a close eye on developments in the country. his comments came wednesday during a news conference where he announced interest rates will remain low. it is one hour. >> hello. my colleagues and i reviewed recent and economic financial developments and discuss the economic outlook. the data had been generally consistent with our expectation that the fourth quarter recovery would prove temporary and modern economic growth would resume. spending by households and businesses have continued to expand. the jobs market has shown signs of improvement o
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)